Spoiled

Once Emma knew someone who thought it funny that she had no brothers or sisters. Having grown up with many siblings herself, the woman liked to say that Emma must have been awfully spoiled when she was little. Because to be an only child meant to be spoiled. It was inevitable. Somehow she never realized…

Secular Stories Part 4: Aristotle or Nietzsche?

This article is part of the series “Secular Stories.” Click below to read other installments: SECULAR STORIES: AN INTRODUCTION SECULAR STORIES PART 1: MACINTYRE’S ‘SUGGESTION’ AND EMOTIVISM SECULAR STORIES PART 2: THE FAILED ENLIGHTENMENT PROJECT SECULAR STORIES PART 3: THE PROBLEM WITH SOCIAL SCIENCES At the beginning of this series, I proposed that the first…

Book Review: “Orthodox Anglican Identity”

Orthodox Anglican Identity: The Quest for Unity in a Diverse Religious Tradition. By Charles Erlandson. Eugene, OR: Pickwick Publications, 2020. 224 pp. $47.00 (cloth), $27.00 (paper). This book is a useful exploration of ecclesial identity through the lens of the Anglican tradition. As the title makes clear, Erlandson explores both the diversity of Anglicanism and…

Secular Stories Part 3: The Problem with Social Sciences

This article is part of the series “Secular Stories.” Click below to read other installments: SECULAR STORIES: AN INTRODUCTION SECULAR STORIES PART 1: MACINTYRE’S ‘SUGGESTION’ AND EMOTIVISM SECULAR STORIES PART 2: THE FAILED ENLIGHTENMENT PROJECT At the beginning of this series, I proposed that the first step toward understanding this “secular” age would be exploring…

Book Review: “A Basic Guide to Eastern Orthodox Theology”

A Basic Guide to Eastern Orthodox Theology: Introducing Beliefs and Practices. By Eve Tibbs. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2021. 224 pp. $26.99 (paper). In a book designed to educate readers about a particular Christian denomination—or “tradition,” as many are now fond of saying—one can reasonably expect such a work to discuss the denomination’s distinctive character,…

A Critique of Transubstantiation

Introduction In my freshman year of college, as a newly minted theology student, I began to think through the question of “Why do we reject Transubstantiation?” I was blessed to have a Systematics professor who assigned the Reformed Orthodox,[1] so, naturally, I picked up my copy of Francis Turretin’s Institutes and scoured the section on…

A Homily for Good Friday Part II

The Second Homily Concerning the Death and Passion of our Saviour Christ That we may the better conceive the great mercy and goodness of our Saviour Christ in suffering death universally for all men, it behoveth us to descend into the bottom of our conscience, and deeply to consider the first and principal cause wherefore…

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