Confirmation in Classical Anglicanism

At the conclusion of the 1662 baptismal liturgy, the minister charges the godparents: Ye are to take care that this Child be brought to the Bishop to be confirmed by him, so soon as he can say the Creed, the Lord’s Prayer, and the Ten Commandments, in the vulgar tongue, and be further instructed in…

Me And Pablo Neruda

I am with my love in La Colombina, a room with forty narrow windows and a stained glass spine to the ceiling and calligraphic iron scribbles for roof support. The sea stands still beyond hillsides of innumerable houses, folded and tucked shapes of plaster and painted tin. A seagull waits at the open window beside…

Dead Water

Between despair and hope, two continents,   a vast sea lies, blank whiteness on the chart.   No waves, no cartographer’s fanciful decorations—a simple nothing, nondescript, immense. Here I tread water. The taste and smell of salt,   irreducible facts, offer no explanations   to map the trackless journeys of the heart:how I came here, whether I’m at fault….

An Homily of Common Prayer and Sacraments

An Homily Wherein is Declared that Common Prayer and Sacraments Ought to be Ministered in a Tongue that is Understanded of the Hearers Among the manifold exercises of God’s people, dear Christians there is none more necessary for all estates and at all times than is Public Prayer and the due use of Sacraments. For…

Call for Poetry Submissions

As the summer comes to a close, it’s time for Daniel Rattelle and me to turn our attention to the serious matter of poetry. Last year, we had a grand old time editing our first volume for Little Gidding Press, The Slumbering Host. I pitched the idea to Dan the first time we met, chatting…

A Canterbury Tale

Johnson was raised as a Baptist. By which I mean he was born in Georgia to parents who held a strong conviction against baptizing any infant who had not at least been to Vacation Bible School. Like most Baptist boys, he was a good Christian until round about the time he got his driver’s license….

Film Review: Emma (2020)

Film Review of Emma (2020) If it is true that, as Alison Milbank puts it, film adaptations of the novels of Jane Austen are marked by “careful visual authenticity in details of clothing and furniture with equally anachronistic dialogue,”[1] then Autumn de Wilde’s new version of Emma fits in with the crowd. But it is…

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