Monthly Archives: March 2021

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An Introduction to Lancelot Andrewes and his Legacy

A cold coming they had of it at this time of the year, just the worst time of the year to take a journey, and specially a long journey in. The ways deep, the weather sharp, the days short, the sun farthest off, in solstitio brumali, “the very dead of winter.” Some of you will…

Building Cathedrals in the Modern Age

“Among the surviving wills it has been found that 45 per cent of testators in fifteenth-century Norwich made such a provision [leaving a bequest to a monastery]. In London it was 36 per cent, and in York about 33 per cent.”[1] The quotation above, when I first read it in Volume III of Kenneth-Hylson-Smith’s Christianity…

Book Review: “The Oxford Movement in Context”

The Oxford Movement in Context: Anglican High Churchmanship, 1760‒1857. By Peter B. Nockles. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994. 364 pp. $55.99 (paper). In Orthodox Anglican Identity, Charles Erlandson identifies four different “spiritualities” that are commonly thought to be encompassed within “orthodox Anglicanism” as a whole: Anglo-Catholic, Evangelical, Charismatic, and Global. The Anglo-Catholic spirituality is…

Genesis and Biblical Anthropology: A Response to Fr. Jefferies

I am writing as a pioneer in the emerging science of Biblical Anthropology, an empirical approach to the canonical Scriptures that avoids denominational interpretations. A Biblical Anthropologist studies the Scriptures to identify anthropologically significant data that clarifies the cultural contexts of ancient biblical populations, and especially the social structure of the biblical Hebrew. This interdisciplinary…

Is Genesis 7 Inerrant?

The question of the inerrancy of Scripture has been freshly addressed in Anglican circles lately. It is such a terribly abstract question, with far too much hanging on semantics. Let us get into the same question from a more practical angle: the battle-scarred territory of Genesis 1-11. Though I didn’t know it by this name,…

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Charles McIlvaine and American Anglican Irenicism

Gerald Bray’s new Anglicanism begins with a chapter spelling out succinctly the history of the Church of England, its sisters, and successors until the middle of the Nineteenth Century. The Anglicanism of the early twenty-first century, Bray notes, “is essentially a nineteenth century invention.” Before the 1840s most members of the Protestant Episcopal Church in…

THE HERMIT HEARS OWLS

Two of them are talking in the woods. The night’s so still and bright with moon that he Lies staring on his pillow. Almost, it’s words He hears tossed back and forth from tree to tree. Almost, it’s wind whose wings slip past the window, Wavering the light. Almost, it’s silence, Almost ghost. From bed…

Hail, Thou That Art Highly Favored

Unable to answer these arguments, I remained silent toward these people; but now I beg you Father, to instruct me in what I should say to defend the truth, so that (following the Apostle’s injunction) I may “be ready to give an account of the faith that is in us.” —St. Gregory Palamas I’ve been…

The Witness of Beauty – An Introduction (Part 3 of 3)

PART 1 PART 2 PART 3 5. The Witness of Beauty in Practice How individual churches can most readily manifest beauty to their communities will vary depending on their circumstances. For this reason, I will not try to be overly specific about what people should do to achieve this end, nor will I suggest any…

A Tempest Observed: Reflections on Sexuality and the ACNA

Last week, noted Calvin College philosopher James K. A. Smith caused a stir on Twitter when he posted a picture of himself wearing a pink “You Are Loved” T-shirt, captioned “At @Calvin Uni, ALL students are welcomed, affirmed, and loved. To our LGBTQ students always, but today especially: #YouAreLoved.” Further context for the pic was…

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