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The Sanctus: Bigger on the Inside

O how sweetly the voices resound there when all the Holy Ones sing the praises of God saying: sanctus Thus we also praise the Lord on earth whom the holy angels praise in the highest saying: sanctus You alone make clean from unclean cleanse us, as long as we are in the world because you…

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A Return to Civilization at St. Dunstan’s Academy

It was just after Ascension Day that we packed up our family and drove over the Blue Ridge Mountains, eastward into the setting sun. Our destination was nowhere, not yet a place, but some land somewhere past the Wintergreen Resort in Nelson County, Virginia. There are few places in America like Appalachia. It is the…

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Kinism and Wolfe’s Case for Christian Nationalism

When my review of Stephen Wolfe’s The Case for Christian Nationalism was published, Fr. Ben Jefferies—a former member of the Liturgy Task Force of the Anglican Church in North America, and a once frequent contributor to The North American Anglican who cut ties after my review was not retracted—posted a comment calling both the book…

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The Future of Anglican Political Theology

Political theology is the order of the day, and my, does it make people emotional. Different tribes of Protestants denounce each other for being un-American, or theocratic, or giving away the gospel in search of power. The war is not even between denominations; even within Calvinist churches and their Baptist adjutants in the United States,…

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The 1928 and Cranmer’s Shape

As I have noted previously, Cranmer’s Eucharistic liturgy of 1552 had a distinctive shape – Law-Gospel-Repentance-Supper-Thanksgiving – which was retained for most Anglican rites down to the middle of the twentieth century. The main, and for almost two hundred years the only, exception was that of the Scottish Episcopal Church, which was a hybrid of…

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Infant Baptism: A Treatise in Defense of Infant Baptism, Written in the Scholastic Style – Part III

This entry is part 3 of 3 in the series Snyder: Scholastic Defense of Infant Baptism

Practical Application Having discussed the reasons for infant baptism, as well as notable arguments against it, and the orthodox responses to those arguments, it remains to be seen why such a work as this treatise is necessary, or at least expedient, and how its content applies to our current ecclesial context. Our practical applications for…

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Cranmer Versus Dix on the Eucharist

One of the old saws when I was training for the ministry, was that Cranmer had the shape of the Communion service all wrong. This assertion was, of course, based on a 1945 book called The Shape of the Liturgy by an Anglican Benedictine called Gregory Dix. Leaving aside the fact that Dix rejected Cranmer’s…

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Infant Baptism: A Treatise in Defense of Infant Baptism, Written in the Scholastic Style – Part II

This entry is part 2 of 3 in the series Snyder: Scholastic Defense of Infant Baptism

Antitheses Credo-baptists argue against infant baptism on multiple fronts: 1) from Scripture, 2) from Christian antiquity, 3) from the discontinuity between baptism and circumcision, 4) from the illustrative deficiencies of infant baptism, and 5) from the risks involved in infant baptism. 1) The antitheses from Holy Scripture usually take one of these three forms. a)…

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Infant Baptism: A Treatise in Defense of Infant Baptism, Written in the Scholastic Style – Part I

This entry is part 1 of 3 in the series Snyder: Scholastic Defense of Infant Baptism

Preface It should be stated that I am writing this treatise primarily for those already holding to the doctrine of infant baptism, that they might have a clearer and more precise understanding of why it is they believe the way they do concerning this article of faith. However, for those open to instruction, I will…

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