Articles by Fr. Wesley Walker

Fr. Wesley Walker

Book Review Editor of The North American Anglican


Book Review: Becoming Human Together

I first read Becoming Human Together: The Pastoral Anthropology of St. Paul for a class on the Apostle. The discussion of anthropology was important in the parish where I was serving at the time and I was hoping to find an entry that could contribute to a more classical Anglo-Catholic understanding of the human person. Further, I…

What We’re Reading – The Spring Edition

One of the things we wanted to do here at The North American Anglican is let our readers know what we’ve been reading! This is especially true during our present situation of being shut-in due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Let us know in the comments what you’ve been reading during this time too! Clinton Collister,…

Call for Book Review Submissions

Here at the North American Anglican, we would like to feature at least one book review a month. If you would like us to consider your book review, please send it as a Microsoft Word document along with a brief biography and photograph of yourself to editor@northamanglican.com with the phrase “Book Review Submission” in the…

On the Day You Were Baptized: Book Review

It is more than fair to say that Christian catechesis in America has been largely ineffective for at least two generations. This is particularly true for sacramental traditions, many experiencing large rates of attrition to Evangelical traditions or no faith altogether. Thanks to the influx of work about intentional Christian living in a post-Christian world,…

A Review of the First Annual Anglican Theology Conference at Beeson Divinity School

Last Tuesday and Wednesday I had the pleasure of attending the first ever Annual Anglican Theology Conference at Beeson Divinity School at Samford University. It included an impressive roster of speakers: Archbishop Eliud Wabukala (Kenya), Archbishop Mouneer Anis (Egypt), Archbishop Foley Beach (ACNA), Ephraim Radner, Gerald Bray, Barabara Gauthier, John Yates III, Andrew Pearson, Gerald…

Dueling Pauls?

One of the tendencies in any theological tradition is to develop a canon in canonem (“canon within a canon”). The Anabaptists have the Sermon on the Mount, or so they claim. The Reformed supposedly have Romans. Catholics will always (falsely) accuse Protestants of reading Paul at the expense of James and Protestants will always (falsely)…

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