Monthly Archives: April 2020

Virtual Daily Office in a Time of Viral Pandemic

For Anglicans and other liturgical Christians around the world, Lent is normally a time for penitence, spiritual discipline, and reflection. At the same time, in the face of an increasingly hostile culture, various Christian writers have advocated that an increased spiritual discipline is required today to inculcate and nourish a faith that can withstand the…

Grey Stone

From youth this cool, grey stone enchanted me,Its beauty one with its simplicity:The Archer of Aphaia poised to strike,Or mighty Neptune with his triple spike,The pointed arches of the Notre-Dame,Ascending heavenward with perfect calm:Their colors were but subtlety and shade,Nor garish nor flamboyant, rather madeOf naught but stone, quite serious and pure.Their substance never fading…

THE LAW ON OUR HEARTS: RICHARD HOOKER AND THOMAS AQUINAS

I. INTRODUCTION “The greatest amongst the School-divines.”[1] These are the words by which Richard Hooker, a sixteenth-century Anglican priest and theologian, expressed his admiration for S. Thomas Aquinas. Regarding Hooker’s admiration for S. Thomas, the Rev. Dr. David Neelands writes that while “Thomas is explicitly cited by Hooker … probably only about eight times in…

Wedding at Cana

Participants in gracious comedy, Francesca and Lotario agree, Find Pleasure sat with Duty, king and queen Upon two wine-dark thrones. Aghast at losing Face, each blamed the other. Pleasure, pale And drained, with croak complained, “Six arduous pails Of sweat and tears without one drop of blood,” While Duty, bloated, raised his fiery head To…

Book Review: Becoming Human Together

I first read Becoming Human Together: The Pastoral Anthropology of St. Paul for a class on the Apostle. The discussion of anthropology was important in the parish where I was serving at the time and I was hoping to find an entry that could contribute to a more classical Anglo-Catholic understanding of the human person. Further, I…

Eastertide

The hermit hangs his habit out to dryIn new sun. Once upon a time he hadTwo habits: one good habit and one bad.Down to one, he’s bare. Today God’s eyeProbes every part of him. The tumbled skyThat shines through broken tesserae of cloudQuickens and touches him. The creek is loudWith springtime. Wading in, he wonders…

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