Monthly Archives: April 2020

Anglicanism’s One Manual Ritual

Liturgically speaking, Anglicanism is remarkably simple. Sure, the Prayer Book requires something of a learning curve, especially modern Prayer Books with all their options and possibilities and multi-year lectionaries. But when you compare the historic Prayer Book tradition to the other great liturgical traditions, particularly Rome and the East, ours is far simpler to follow,…

Judgments on Judgment

Reading the thoughts of many of the highest profile Christian writers and leaders, we are led to believe that God must have very little to do with great and calamitous events like the COVID-19 pandemic. N.T. Wright’s encouragement to lament instead of advance to explain might have come as welcome pastoral advice if it was…

In Praise of Failure

 “It hath been the wisdom of the Church of England, ever since the first compiling of her public Liturgy, to keep the mean between two extremes.” For those quietly disembarking the revivalist and biblicist excesses of their evangelical patrimony, a refreshing mark of the formularies of the English Church is their comprehensive appeal to Christian…

Suger and the Golden Eagle

 1137 What were you? What benighted ritual functionserved you? Did you catch from slaughtered calvesthe ruby of their veins, and mete its halvesbetween strange gods and men who begged their unction?Would still man’s breast rekindle dark desireshould I from Eve’s lips wrest the unbit apple?I wrought the pagan archway in my chapel,yet still the kings…

In Praise of 1552: a High Church appreciation

The Book of Common Prayer 1552: it is the bête noire of Anglican liturgy. Frere famously declared that with it “English religion reached its low water mark.”[1] Dix damned it with the most horrible imprecation he could summon: Zwinglian.[2] We all know, of course, that to be High Church means always choosing 1549 over 1552….

Why Is the ACNA Altar Book Trying to Be a Missal?

This week, the ACNA published a draft of a proposed altar book for the 2019 BCP, which you can find here. Interestingly, the draft breaks from its predecessors, the official 1979 BCP altar book and 1928 BCP altar book, in that it contains prayers and ceremonial additions not found in the standard BCP, thus resembling…

The Supper of the Lamb and Lent-Pandemic Cooking

Finding myself cooking more than ever and in need of some inspiration, I’ve lately returned to Robert Farrar Capon’s Supper of the Lamb: A Culinary Reflection. Written by an Episcopal priest back in 1967, The Supper of the Lamb is both a quirky cookbook and a doxological digression on the nature of reality. Since he…

Monastics, Every One of Us

In the midst of life we are in death; of whom may we seek for help, but you, O Lord, who for our sins are justly displeased? The Committal, ACNA Book of Common Prayer, 2019, page 260 The selected quote may also be found in the Anthem to the Holy Saturday service, on page 579…

The Place of Holy Tradition, Part I

Sacra Scriptura | Holy Scripture Introduction Within my preliminary essay Principles and Distinctives of Anglican Ceremonial, I included a brief page discussing the Anglican view, as differentiated from the Roman and Eastern view, of Tradition and the role it plays in the framing of doctrine. As this piece has been read by friends and colleagues…

What We’re Reading – The Spring Edition

One of the things we wanted to do here at The North American Anglican is let our readers know what we’ve been reading! This is especially true during our present situation of being shut-in due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Let us know in the comments what you’ve been reading during this time too! Clinton Collister,…

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