Monthly Archives: July 2020

Brothers, We Are Not Marcionites

As part of the release of The Foolishness of God, we are running a series of articles by J. Brandon Meeks. The Old Testament is dying. Or so says Brent Strawn.[1] I tend to agree with his diagnosis. In many of our parishes, it is already time for a toe-tag. Someone said to me recently, “I…

The Beauty of Holiness: A Hymnody That Forms Christians

In American Christianity, including theologically conservative congregations across the United States, a formative part of Christian worship has become imbalanced over the last generation or two. Namely, the range of hymnody has skewed to songs composed in our own narrow cultural context of the past 20 years. This trend has sidelined hymnody that fosters musical…

Online Communion: A Lutheran Perspective

Covid-19 has sent all of society into crisis mode, but the church has felt most acutely the effects of the pandemic. Worship services have been cancelled, hospital visitation curtailed or eliminated, and bible studies have been put on hiatus. Clergy, not knowing the right response, have sought to care for souls in the most readily…

Fourth of July

The streetlights flicker, set to hummingLike mosquitoes in the amber nightOf tree frogs and fireworks, unforked lightning,Spine-tickling rivulets of sweat. This is the stuff, I think, this the life  I recall from my youth by the ocean,  Days of marsh grass and the sun’s gold-leaf,Heinekens, Merits, the soulful motion Of lights across the bay. A couple thereSits…

Godric of Finchale as a Thorn Tree

Homage to Frederick Buechner The thorn was bronze and wonderful to see,Though no one’s safe around such scimitars That escalade against the very sky. Yet scimitar by scimitar it rose,And being made so barbed and barbarous, Perhaps it meant no harm but harmed by chance. Woodcutters could have axed and hacked the treeTo toss a greenwood crackle…

Am I a Soul or a Body?

An Excerpt from An Introduction to Theological Anthropology: Humans, Both Creaturely and Divine There exists a growing trend in theological anthropology toward what has been called Christian materialism. By Christian materialism, I am referring to the position that we are strictly identical to our bodies—albeit sophisticated bodies, our brains, or our animal (i.e., a biological…

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