Is Classical Anglicanism Catholic?

Once again, we are very happy here at The North American Anglican to be hosting these conversations. Particularly significant is the fact that many are excited for Anglicanism’s future, and rather than taking a 20th century approach of “every man does what is right in his own eyes,” these essays seek to establish a more…

Is This Anglicanism? Brief Reflections on Tract I

I wish to start by wholeheartedly expressing my appreciation that the writers of The North American Anglican have sought to offer a new series of tracts for the 21st century, and I commend the author of Tract I, Fr. Charles Erlandson, for attempting a definition of Anglicanism. Global Anglicanism is in need of a definition,…

Prayer for a Prayer by a Nonbeliever

I saw a fellow praying by a sandwiched city church, his eyes screwed up and swaying on that sort-of parrot perch. A comic picture, nearly, he presented to me. Still he kept mouthing on sincerely, letting words in silence spill. Through the smelly candlesmoke I watched him, earnest, there, and, reaching deep for habit, spoke…

Tract I: What Is Anglicanism?

Tracts for the Times 2.0 I’m often asked the question, “What is Anglicanism?” To which I respond: “Do you want the two-word answer, the long one-sentence answer, or my book on Anglican identity?  Avoiding having to answer the question of what Anglicanism is has been a favorite Anglican hobby for decades, and when we do…

A Better Intentionalism: Toward A more Transparent Tractarian Historiography

Seeking to interpret the meaning of a text by sourcing it in the perceived intentions of the author(s) is the hermeneutical strategy called ‘Intentionalism.’ Pace, some of the overstatements of 20th century hermeneutical theorists, seeking to understand the intentions of an author remains a noble endeavor in the quest for understanding. Certainly, to enter the fray of competing Anglican narratives…

What is an “Evangelical?”

What is an “evangelical”? In the preface to Christian Faith: Dogmatics in Outline (2016) B. A. Gerrish explored the question as an exercise in self-identification: “[O]thers, whether approving or scornfully, have called me a “liberal,” whereas I have always considered myself an “evangelical” in the old, Reformation sense: one who holds that “the real treasure…

“Who shall ascend into the hill of the Lord?”

The first time I ever preached on Psalm 24, I was struck by John Calvin’s gloss on verse eight. He wrote, “Mount Sion, it is true, is not at this day the place appointed for the sanctuary, and the ark of the covenant is no longer the image or representation of God dwelling between the…

Simplified Plainsong: An Unwritten Musical Resource for Anglicans in the 21st Century?

William Law once remarked, “For singing is as much the proper use of a Psalm as devout supplication is the proper use of a form of prayer. And a psalm only read is very much like a prayer that is only looked over.” Anyone who has had the privilege of worshiping in a community that chants…

Hydrangeas

The blade, the cuts, the sighs. Inner pith grown hotter. A vase of injured limbs. Do this to resurrect: Rinse and gash, repeat. Hammer till fibers split. Blossoms’ bee-swarm (hurt-flecked By memories of heat) All loveliness and grit… Life rises from mangle, From stems slashed at angle.

Announcing Tracts for the Times 2.0

In my first article for The North American Anglican, I envisioned a renewed traditional, Prayer-Book Anglicanism which I called “Tracts for the Times 2.0.” In retrospect, I see I equivocated in my meaning of the phrase, using it both to mean an actual set of Tracts and also a renewed movement in the Church akin…

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