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On the Liturgical Resumptive

One characteristic of the Book of Common Prayer, and of liturgical prose generally, is repetition, often repetition with variation. Repetition has many purposes. It is an aid to memory. It makes our worship adhere more closely to biblical patterns, for the Scriptures are shot through with repetition with variation.1Samuel L. Bray and John F. Hobbins, Genesis…

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A Review of the First Annual Anglican Theology Conference at Beeson Divinity School

Last Tuesday and Wednesday I had the pleasure of attending the first ever Annual Anglican Theology Conference at Beeson Divinity School at Samford University. It included an impressive roster of speakers: Archbishop Eliud Wabukala (Kenya), Archbishop Mouneer Anis (Egypt), Archbishop Foley Beach (ACNA), Ephraim Radner, Gerald Bray, Barabara Gauthier, John Yates III, Andrew Pearson, Gerald…

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The Home Altar

A home altar is an Ebenezer, a stone of remembrance. It is a semi-public display of one’s priorities in life. You may hide it away in a back room, following the advice of Jesus to go into your closet to pray, but it is a shared space, available for your whole family and for guests…

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No Health

In the classic Books of Common Prayer, Morning and Evening Prayer begin with a confession of sin. Modern liturgical revisers struggle with some of the wording, finding it too definite and too hard to say. The phrase, “…and there is no health in us…” is particularly troubling to them. It shouldn’t be. Because they are…

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