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Is Classical Anglicanism Catholic?

Once again, we are very happy here at The North American Anglican to be hosting these conversations. Particularly significant is the fact that many are excited for Anglicanism’s future, and rather than taking a 20th century approach of “every man does what is right in his own eyes,” these essays seek to establish a more…

A Better Intentionalism: Toward A more Transparent Tractarian Historiography

Seeking to interpret the meaning of a text by sourcing it in the perceived intentions of the author(s) is the hermeneutical strategy called ‘Intentionalism.’ Pace, some of the overstatements of 20th century hermeneutical theorists, seeking to understand the intentions of an author remains a noble endeavor in the quest for understanding. Certainly, to enter the fray of competing Anglican narratives…

What is an “Evangelical?”

What is an “evangelical”? In the preface to Christian Faith: Dogmatics in Outline (2016) B. A. Gerrish explored the question as an exercise in self-identification: “[O]thers, whether approving or scornfully, have called me a “liberal,” whereas I have always considered myself an “evangelical” in the old, Reformation sense: one who holds that “the real treasure…

Response to “The Old Religion”

I enjoyed reading Fr. Wilgus’ piece ‘The Old Religion’ this last week here on The North American Anglican. Its call to a return of a Reformed Catholicity within Anglicanism resonated with many of the other discussions we’ve been having on the site, and I agree with the core claim of the piece that Anglicanism (in…

Parish Notices and Common Prayer

“Announcements! Announcements! Announcements!” You may have a certain little ditty that plays in your head when you see a three-fold repetition of the word “announcements.” If you don’t know what I’m referring to, you’re to be envied. In any event, I trust you do not hear this little ditty at your local Anglican church. Yet…

On Saintly Celebration

Almighty God, you have knit together your elect in one communion and fellowship in the mystical Body of your Son: Give us grace so to follow your blessed saints in all virtuous and godly living, that we may come to those ineffable joys that you have prepared for those who truly love you; through Jesus…

Tracts for the Times 2.0

The launch of the Oxford Movement is traditionally dated (following John Henry Newman’s reckoning) from John Keble’s Assize sermon on Bastille Day, July 14, 1833. But it wasn’t until the inauguration of The Tracts for the Times, also in 1833, that the Oxford Movement became a public movement for the renewal of the Church of…

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